September/October 2001

David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive, Va savoir; Richard Linklater’s Waking Life, Cahiers du Cinema at 50, Jacques Rivette’s Va Savoir, Bela Tarr, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Richard Kelly, Abbas Kiarostami’s A.B.C. Africa, Eric Rohmer’s The Lady and the Duke

Subscribe Purchase

Featured Articles

Issue Details

FEATURES

ABC IN AFRICA
By Jonathan Rosenbaum
Abbas Kiarostami’s new film is both an extension of his signature style and a surprisingly musical departure.

WAKING LIFE
By Chris Chang
If life is but a dream, what happens when you wake up? Richard Linklater provides a multitude of answers.

VA SAVOIR
By Chris Chang
The Nouvelle Vague enters the nouveau millennium as Jacques Rivette does what he does best: peel away his actors’ mask to reveal the truth that lies within us all.

Plus: Kent Jones on the mercurial French femme Jeanne Balibar

CAHIERS DU CINEMA
By Dave Kehr
As the godfather of film journals turns 50, we trace it back to its beginning under the watchful eye of Bazin to the heyday of Godard, Truffaut, and co.

Plus: Chris Darke on the rest of the story, from the Sixties to the present.

LEONARDO FAVIO
By David Oubiña
When he picks up a microphone and sings, he drives women crazy. When he’s behind the camera, he’s one of Argentina’s greatest living directors—albeit one completely unknown outside his homeland. Is he proof that the art house can be both popular and populist?

MULHOLLAND DRIVE
By Phillip Lopate and Amy Taubin
Continuing this issue’s dreaming thread, who better than David Lynch to put things in perspective by providing an absolute nightmare? It’s a true schizoid masterpiece, and we need two writers to handle it.

BÉLA TARR
By Jonathan Romney
It’s unlikely you’ve seen either Werckmeister Harmonies or Sátántangó, or, for that matter, any of the films of this Hungarian master. We tell you why it’s worth the effort to follow him down his uniquely mystical, mythical road.

KIYOSHI KUROSAWA
By Chuck Stevens
Yes, there’s another great Japanese director named Kurosawa. Cop movies, horror films, ghost stories, yakuza flicks, sci-fi freak-outs: you name it, the king of Japan’s New New Wave has made them all, sometimes in the same movie.

DEPARTMENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

OPENING SHOTS
News, Chatterbox, Frame-Ups: Wiley Wiggins, Patrice Chereau’s Guilty Pleasures, Off the Shelf

BOOKS
Essential Writings of Stan Brakhage reviewed by Brian Frye; Cassavetes on Cassavetes reviewed by Michael Koresky

FIRST LOOK
Eric Rohmer’s The Lady and the Duke by Frédéric Bonnaud

HOLLYWOOD JOURNAL
Screenwriter Larry Gross on the phantom strike, media complicity, and why smart independent films make Hollywood dumb and dumber

SOUND & VISION
Chris Norris on the soundtrack to Larry Clark’s Bully & Jason Salavon on The Top Grossing Film of All Time, 1 x 1, his radical photographic re-imagining of Titanic

DISCOVERY
Richard Kelly by Mark Olsen

DISTRIBUTOR WANTED
Demane Davis and Khari Streeter’s Lift by Elvis Mitchell

CRITIC’S CHOICE
Eight critics rate 25 new releases

REVIEW
Joel Coen’s The Man Who Wasn’t There by Paul Arthur, Stephen Herek’s Rock Star by Chris Norris, John Dahl’s Joy Ride by Andrew Lewis Conn

VIDI VIDI VIDI
Nicole Armour on Francesco Rosi’s Three Brothers

FSLC SEEN
Who’s who at recent Film Society events