November/December 1982

Special midsection on adapting novels and film, Casablanca in 1982, profile and interview with Goldie Hawn, Matty Simmons’ Class Reunion, Jerzy Skolimowski, Bill Richert, Louise Brooks’ autobiography, Canadian film festivals, Grace Kelly obituary, television movies

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THE ‘CASABLANCA’ CAPER
A few years ago, Chuck Ross submitted the manuscript of an award-winning novel to the big New York publishers; none recognized it, all rejected it. Now he’s had a go at the movie industry, sending the script of Casablanca to 200 movie agents. You’ll be surprised at the number that didn’t recognize the script, and amused at the responses he got. A cautionary tale, to which Richard Corliss adds musings on how Casablanca would fare in today’s market.

SKOLIMOWSKI’S ‘MOONLIGHTING’
Jerzy Skolimowski has had a remarkable career as part of the Polish New Wave, as wandering filmmaker, and now as writer-director of the splendid Moonlighting. Dan Yakir offers a sympathetic overview of Skolimowski’s films; he talks with the director and with Jeremy Irons, whose performance as the troubled foreman in Moonlighting should win him an Oscar nomination.

MIDSECTION: NOVELS & FILM
When you read the book, you make the movie. So why does Hollywood (film or TV division) keep trying to remake it for you? Lawrence O’Toole provides first and final principles on the subject. Ray Bradbury, who’s done his share of writing and screenwriting, talks with Mitch Tuchman about both crafts. And Stephen Farber surveys the TV-miniseries scene, where the pop epic novels have found a voracious new audience.

GOLDIE GETS SERIOUS
She’s Hollywood’s kookie sweetheart, the not-quite-but-almost liberated woman. Goldie Hawn may be the only female in today’s industry whose presence guarantees big grosses. Now she heads her own production company, looking for new scripts. David Thomson praises and interviews.

JOURNALS
The ghost of R.W. Fassbinder enlivened Venice this year; Harlan Kennedy reports. Leonard Maltin went to Ottawa, Mary Corliss to Toronto, and both have good things to say about Canadian festivals.

WILD BILL RICHERT
His only two films, Winter Kills and Success, were casualties of the sputtering studio system. But they are nonetheless remarkable. Now he’s retrieved his orphans to give them a new life. By Richard T. Jameson.

LAMPOONING THE MOVIES
They struck with Animal House. They may strike out with Class Reunion. But a flop can’t stop Matty Simmons’ gang. Myron Meisel has the story.

NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL
It was Lincoln Center’s 20th annual movie bash. The new films are reviewed by Elliott Stein (who liked The Trout) and James McCourt (who liked the Taviani). Harlan Jacobson appraises six documentaries.

BOOKS
Lulu’s back in print. David Chute on Louise Brooks’ autobiography.

TELEVISION
Sneak Previews is a big PBS hit. But what service does it offer? And how were its new stars chosen? Marcia Froelke Coburn and Richard Corliss have the story and some thoughts.

INDEPENDENTS
There’s a vital new journalism review—on cable. By Amos Vogel.

OBITS
Grace Kelly: princess on the screen. Richard Corliss pays tribute.

BULLETIN BOARD