November/December 1979

Special midsection on Werner Herzog, Blake Edwards and Klaus Kinski profiled, New York Film Festival reviews, William K. Everson’s guilty pleasures

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MIDSECTION: WERNER HERZOG
Werner Herzog's mystical fables have been mesmerizing Film Festival audiences for over a decade. But it was not until 1977, and the belated release of Aguirre, the Wrath of God, that his reputation spread beyond the campuses and film museums. Now, on the occasion of Nosferatu’s release, Lawrence O’Toole makes a strong case for Herzog as a unique visionary, whose images compel us to see things anew. Herzog himself speaks revealingly and eloquently of his life and his films. And Brooks Riley considers the career of Klaus Kinski, Herzog’s Aguirre and Nosferatu.

BLAKE EDWARDS TAKES ‘10’
With the success of “10”, Blake Edwards is ripe for George Morris’s reappraisal. And Dudley Moore explains to Dan Yakir his move from the fringes of farce to the heart of romantic comedy.

BERTOLUCCI GOES TO THE MOON
Bertolucci, Clayburgh, a story of incestuous love—that’s Luna. Paul Schwartzman was on the set, and describes how the director creates his seductive mise en scène.

JOURNALS
Gilbert Adair goes to London, in search of the inauthentic experience. Todd McCarthy, who knew Claudia Jennings Back When, recalls the short, archetypal life of the Queen of the B’s.

ATTENTION: MEN AT WORK
What does Jaws have in common with Man of Aran? Escape from Alcatraz with A Man Escapes? One way or another, in Hollywood gloss or neo-realist grit, they tell stories of physical labor—how everyday life is lived. Raymond Durgnat and Judith Bloch report on these films of men at work.

EVERSON’S GUILTY PLEASURES
The eminent historian recalls a childhood of moviegoing: sneaking into X-rated films, and trying to concentrate on a Western while eluding a child molester! Such, such were the joys.

THE CLICHÉ EXPERT’S GUIDE
Everything you already knew about the movies. By Gilbert Adair.

NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL
Readers will be shocked to learn that Elliott Stein and James McCourt, our longtime Festival critics, actually agreed on the merits of many of the films this year. Also: Diane Jacobs on the American Independents series.

PEOPLE WE LIKE: WINTON HOCH
Winton Hoch photographed some of John Ford’s most gorgeous color films (The Searchers, The Quiet Man, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon). Now Joseph McBride gives the cinematographer his posthumous due.

INDEPENDENTS
Amos Vogel reports from the Conference for an Alternative Cinema.

TELEVISION
Daniel Menaker weighs the new season, and finds it anorexic.

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