November/December 1990

Stephen Frear’s The Grifters, Fritz Lang’s centenary, Barry Levinson interviewed, F.W. Murnau and Robert Flaherty’s Tabu, a career appreciation of Theo Angelopoulos, Arthur Terry, Robert Towne, David Lynch’s Wild at Heart, Toronto and Venice

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GRAND CANAL GOSSIP
By Harlan Kennedy
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are stillborn, plus other Venetian traumas

FRITZ LANG, OUR CONTEMPORARY
By Peter Hogue
The great German-American director—whose centenary is December 5—left a legacy that looks richer, and more modern, with each passing year

STORYTELLER
Barry Levinson interviewed by Gavin Smith
In quest of Avalon

SUNRISE IN BORA BORA
By Scott Eyman
In 1929, two world-class filmmakers, F.W. Murnau and Robert Flaherty, went to Tahiti to make a movie together, and wound up hating each other’s guts. A production history of the newly restored Tabu

STRAIGHT TO HELL
By Maitland McDonagh
Stephen Frears, Donald E. Westlake, and a never-better cast take on Jim Thompson’s The Grifters

THE POWER AND THE GLORY
By Michael Wilmington
If Theo Angelopoulos were the world’s greatest filmmaker, would U.S. audiences know about it? A career appreciation

CHILDREN OF PARADISE
By Kathleen Murphy
On Angelopoulos’s Landscape in the Mist

THE LONG TAKE IN VOYAGE TO CYTHERA
By Raymond Durgnat
Brecht & Marx vs. Bazin & God

WORKING UP TO POVERTY ROW
By Frank Thompson
Arthur Terry pursued mediocrity with a vengeance, stumbling every step of the way

FAULT LINES
By Mark Horowitz
Robert Towne wrote Chinatown, and no one’s about to let him forget it

DEAD HEAT ON A MERRY-GO-ROUND
By Kathleen Murphy
David Lynch’s sweet bird of arrested development, Wild at Heart

TUMULT IN THE CLOUDS
By Donald Lyons
The Memphis Belle flies again

SUNLESS DAYS
By David Chute
Toronto 1990: a fan’s notes